Credit Union Geek

Marketing, Strategy, and The Force by Joe Winn

Tag: support

Why My Credit Union Is No Longer My PFI

Originally published on CUInsight.com

A few months ago, I slipped a mention of my own credit union relationship. My CU of many years was no longer my PFI. Banking shouldn’t be an exercise in compromises and hassles, yet that was what it had become. My PFI is now an institution which is so seamlessly easy and tailored to my needs that I often forget what it was like to have problems (Anything that has come up was handled within a few minutes, no matter the medium).

So, not all credit unions are the same. Besides being designed for differing memberships, they can also have a varied capacity for improvement. It’s why I keep talking about finding the right partners. Maybe a dozen CUs can afford to keep up with innovations on their own; the rest must find strategic partners. However, I digress. My CU wasn’t doing either.

During my time as an active member, here’s some of the challenges I encountered:

  • My debit card was compromised. It happens. But replacement taking 2 weeks? I asked for sooner and they wanted to charge $25 for a 3 day timeframe. The Big Banks replace overnight. Build the cost in; the alternative will only upset members.
  • A $100 member reward program failed to deposit funds when promised. Noticed a month later and had to speak to them to get it resolved.
  • Customer support hold times have never been less than 5 minutes. Typically, it was up to 45 minutes, with no system for callbacks in place.
  • No service on weekends after 1
  • Poor support on their mobile app (see post about the security issue, still unresolved)
  • Hard limit on mobile check deposit amounts less than 10% that of competing institutions. Their suggestion was to visit a branch to deposit instead.
  • Online secure contact form takes 48 hours to get a reply

I’ve actually had a number of other issues, but have forgotten the details for inclusion here. The credit union mission is special amongst banking institutions, but it’s not the only thing which matters. You still have to be a top-quality solution for your members. And, if your members have a problem, your resolution process needs to be seamless. It’s as if I’ve written about these things before.

After sharing some of these things on Twitter, I had more than one credit union trying to gain my membership. Unfortunately, I was not eligible by geography or work. However, they were on top of member recruitment and ensuring they were serving not only their members, but potential ones anywhere. Alliant still wants my loan for that Tesla I’m totally getting eventually. 🙂

What are you doing to ensure your members adopt you as their PFI, and not, as I did, fall away from the relationship?

Are You A Dumb Pipe? (Part 1)

Are dark days ahead for credit unions? I hope not. Changing my name will be a real pain.

You’ve heard the rumblings. “Credit unions don’t adopt modern technology, so Millenials will abandon them.” “Traditional financial institutions are the analog film of our time.” Just as computers did not herald the end of paper, mobile and other technologies will not doom the bank.

There is another possibility, however, and the term originates as a descriptor of the telecom industry as content providers (Netflix, YouTube, etc.) grew in leaps and bounds. They did not want to be stuck delivering only the signal, but to get a piece of the action. To be an active participant, instead of…A Dumb Pipe.

I am a member of a credit union (duh), but I’ll be honest: I use their app solely for deposits. All my other financial management, from account balances to budgeting, is managed elsewhere. I use a platform called Mint, though there are others delivering a similar service. In one place, I can see (but not change) my entire financial life and how trends, budgets, and savings coexist. Do I want to know how much I’ve dedicated towards taxes this year? Easy. What is my total debt to income ratio? Done. Compared to the six-month period prior? Still not a challenge.

This is one possible future of financial management, but there’s another far more menacing to the incumbents: Becoming a dumb bank.

Imagine a future where all your members want from you is a place to hold their money, a big safe. All member-facing products and services are managed by other companies. Not only do you rarely become front stage for your members (unless something goes wrong), you have few opportunities to discuss the programs which support the institution. Guess someone else will reap the profits of your debit cards.

But all is not darkness ahead! This is an important topic, so to ensure I’m covering it sufficiently, the discussion is separated into three parts. Next post, we will look at new technologies and strategies in the financial services industry. We will work together to figure out how you can become a leader through partnerships and smart growth, because “dumb” and “credit unions” should not be uttered in the same sentence.  The final discussion will address the challenges of adopting new tech and avoiding alienation of your comfortable members; is there a way to be future-ready while preserving your core?  That’s a question for a few weeks from now.  Be sure to subscribe to my e-mails (on your right) so you don’t miss anything!

Is Your Computer Reminiscing You Into Insecurity?

The Internet is a unique place. Where else can you come in with antiques that are only a few years old? And even more, those “antiques” can put you in danger! Imagine if your car, at the end of the lease, was considered “obsolete”. So much for that ’65 muscle car! May as well get rid of it now before it explodes at a stoplight. Really, it’s only a matter of time!

Yes, the pace of digital improvement is staggering. As is the pace of obsolescence. Part of it is “planned”, where a manufacturer or developer wants you to buy their latest version, so they stop supporting the previous. Another aspect is opportunity cost. Keeping security and compatibility updates flowing for an older product requires staff time and resources. At what point does that investment become a losing proposition?

The core of our network-connected society has become the web browser. What used to be “just another program” on your computer has evolved into an operating system of its own. Suffice it to say, your trusty IE, Firefox, Safari, or Chrome (or Opera, if you’re one of the brave outliers) does an incredible amount of work behind the scenes. They are what allows us to receive notifications from websites, load full 3D games in a webpage, play back videos without additional software, and display engaging websites powered directly by the computer’s video card. If you want to see how far we’ve come, simply install an old version of Mozilla Firefox, say, 1.5 (from 2005), into your computer. Watch how slow browsing becomes, how many sites refuse to load, or do, but with horrid interfaces.

Unfortunately, with the good comes the bad. There are individuals and groups out there which want to do harm to your computer. Some for “fun”, others for profit, and still more for political motivations. As a result, your lock is always being picked. Good thing there are security teams devoted to closing these holes at every company! Security updates are the main reason why you receive regular updates on your computer…do them! Patch Tuesday, the monthly Windows Update, may include dozens of security fixes for the operating system and Internet Explorer. Each time you skip one of these, you are leaving your door unlocked for the person who knows where to look.

Which brings us to the point. I had a peek at my logs for credituniongeek.com. Between the period of November 17, 2014 and December 17th, 2014, my site was visited by potentially unsupported web browsers. 10.28% were using Internet Explorer 8, which, if you’re on XP, is no longer receiving security updates. An additional 4.67% were browsing on IE 7, an incarnation of the program which struggles to load much of the modern internet, and, as well, has unpatched security vulnerabilities. Read Microsoft’s official support policy.

I understand if your credit union has custom software running on old platforms. It’s expensive to change, and if it still serves your staff and members, why upgrade? That’s fine. But these systems cannot be connected to the public internet. Especially at a financial institution, this is asking for security breaches. Even with good procedures, it happens, all, the, time.

For the safety of your credit union, members, and staff, please update your public-facing systems.

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