Credit Union Geek

Marketing, Strategy, and The Force by Joe Winn

Tag: staff

The Importance of CU Staff in New Program Launches

Originally published on CUInsight.com

Hooray! Your credit union finalized another service partnership! It’s been a long road of due diligence, contracts, negotiations, board meetings, and conference calls, but you’re done.

The time has arrived for implementation!

“I get the feeling Joe is going to say the hard part is just starting.” How do you always know what I’m thinking?

While it doesn’t have to be the “hard part”, making a strategy work is always more than set-and-forget.

Marketing

Let’s start with building a marketing plan. Unless you don’t want anyone to know about it. Which is…odd, but your choice.

For everyone else, it’s time to decide the target audience for your new service. Is it every member? Possibly, but more likely, there’s something that makes some better prospects. Figure that out, and tailor your messaging and outreach to them.

We call it a “buyer persona” and it will help you focus your efforts most efficiently.

Staff

What about staff? Do they have any role in the success of this new service? Maybe just a tiny bit. Or a lot. Even staff who don’t regularly meet with members can play a massive part in making or breaking a launch.

So how do you educate them while building buy-in, excitement, and support? Great question.

Staff Need To Love It

There are a lot of systems that keep your credit union operating. From your core to the LOS to cash counters, it’s a lot of tech. But you and I know what really keeps the credit union running: Your dedicated staff.

Which means that new service needs them to love it, too, if you want it to succeed. What is your strategy to build this relationship?

Seems simple enough: Distribute a staff FAQ to ensure they’re aware. Then hold branch manager trainings. It’s a golden recipe for success, right? I mean, who doesn’t love training sessions?

Your Staff Are Members

Let’s back up a bit. When your credit union first approached this program, there was a clear member benefit, right? Of course. And your staff? Many of them are members, too.

What does that mean? Well, treat them as extra-lucky members! How cool they get to use this awesome new program before anyone else!

Soft-launch your new service with them. Not only is this an engaging way to educate them about the service and its benefits, but it also connects them to it. (Plus, it lets you work out any kinks without the risk of customer service crises.)

Now, when your members have questions, they’ll feel comfortable talking about it (and possibly even excitedly recommending).

Remember, staff are members.

Let Them Play

I run training sessions for our own services, and always conclude with this statement:

“We encourage you to use this system on your own; in test mode, you can play all you want. Get comfortable, because what’s comfortable for you becomes easy to recommend to your members. You’re helping, not selling, and isn’t that why you’re at a credit union in the first place?”

Your staff is the front line to your members. As trusted advisors, they can make or break any initiative. Understanding that unique relationship, we bring them into our launch and ongoing promotion efforts.

Rewards

For example, over the holidays, we run campaigns which raise money for their foundation. It may not directly educate about the service, but it definitely helps associate it positively with your team.

Through the year, we encourage our clients to give staff ownership in the programs. If it fits your culture, staff incentives, giveaways, and other rewards are fun ways to ensure the service stays top of mind.

In Sight. In Mind.

Over the long-term, we aim for in-sight, in mind. This can mean different things at your institution, and also depending on what the new service is.

One option is having a physical marketing piece of functional value. That way, each staff member can refer to it when speaking with members.

Involve Staff

Marketing is an essential way to reach your members. But it’s evolving. Inbound marketing strategies let you address their challenges without intrusive pieces. Staff also play an important role.

Their engagement and training is crucial to build trust and ensure consistent growth. Together, you have a solid plan for success.

Disclosure: My company works with credit unions and their staff for promoting services to their membership. When our partners use these strategies, they improve their results, thereby causing me to benefit financially. Looking back, this seems like the most obvious disclosure I’ve ever written.

Thinking Community (and Pi)

What a whirlwind adventure! This week was my first CUNA Governmental Affairs Conference. For those who attended either this year or have in the past, you know what is involved. To anyone in the industry who has not…2016 will be here before you know it. So register now.

Seriously. If you’re a vendor, here’s an opportunity to meet more influential representatives of credit unions than you could ever reach otherwise. For staff of CUs, this is how you grasp what it truly means to work for a co-op. Mingle with others who quickly become friends and share how to make your institution ever-better. Management: Find your companions in credit unions large and small. Exchange a knowing conversation on how each strives to improve their respective communities.

And did I mention you are in DC? Yep. That’s the G of the conference. Like any respectable interest, you must lobby your representatives to fight for your cause. Unfortunately, this is Congress, not the United Federation of Planets. Money and power are king here, and for a group consisting of not-for-profits, the former is a challenge. So, show your collective influence. Make them understand how you fight for your members, not a group of shareholders.

At the beginning of the conference, I met a gentleman who was a Board Member Emeritus of his credit union. His term? Over 50 years, with no financial compensation. He does it for the love of the cause. He sees the good that comes of the credit union, adds what he can to keep it growing. With a genuine desire to help others and a heart of gold (he won a drawing and offered me half the winnings…would you do that?), it’s people like him that represent what makes credit unions different.

There is so much more to say, and other learning experiences to share, so keep an eye out for future posts about the conference. If you want analysis of issues or lobbying results, read elsewhere. I’ll be looking to the human interests, the tales that collectively tell the story of Credit Unions.

Also, tomorrow is Pi Day, when geeks everywhere celebrate a fundamental value of our universe. Like circles? You like Pi. Everyone loves Pi! However, this isn’t just another 3/14. This Pi Day comes once a century. Pi begins 3.1415926. So, on 3/14/15 at 9:26 PM, we’re having a party. One that won’t be repeated for another hundred years.

The only issue? Sweet or savory?

(That’s a dumb question. The answer is obviously “both!”)

Is Your Computer Reminiscing You Into Insecurity?

The Internet is a unique place. Where else can you come in with antiques that are only a few years old? And even more, those “antiques” can put you in danger! Imagine if your car, at the end of the lease, was considered “obsolete”. So much for that ’65 muscle car! May as well get rid of it now before it explodes at a stoplight. Really, it’s only a matter of time!

Yes, the pace of digital improvement is staggering. As is the pace of obsolescence. Part of it is “planned”, where a manufacturer or developer wants you to buy their latest version, so they stop supporting the previous. Another aspect is opportunity cost. Keeping security and compatibility updates flowing for an older product requires staff time and resources. At what point does that investment become a losing proposition?

The core of our network-connected society has become the web browser. What used to be “just another program” on your computer has evolved into an operating system of its own. Suffice it to say, your trusty IE, Firefox, Safari, or Chrome (or Opera, if you’re one of the brave outliers) does an incredible amount of work behind the scenes. They are what allows us to receive notifications from websites, load full 3D games in a webpage, play back videos without additional software, and display engaging websites powered directly by the computer’s video card. If you want to see how far we’ve come, simply install an old version of Mozilla Firefox, say, 1.5 (from 2005), into your computer. Watch how slow browsing becomes, how many sites refuse to load, or do, but with horrid interfaces.

Unfortunately, with the good comes the bad. There are individuals and groups out there which want to do harm to your computer. Some for “fun”, others for profit, and still more for political motivations. As a result, your lock is always being picked. Good thing there are security teams devoted to closing these holes at every company! Security updates are the main reason why you receive regular updates on your computer…do them! Patch Tuesday, the monthly Windows Update, may include dozens of security fixes for the operating system and Internet Explorer. Each time you skip one of these, you are leaving your door unlocked for the person who knows where to look.

Which brings us to the point. I had a peek at my logs for credituniongeek.com. Between the period of November 17, 2014 and December 17th, 2014, my site was visited by potentially unsupported web browsers. 10.28% were using Internet Explorer 8, which, if you’re on XP, is no longer receiving security updates. An additional 4.67% were browsing on IE 7, an incarnation of the program which struggles to load much of the modern internet, and, as well, has unpatched security vulnerabilities. Read Microsoft’s official support policy.

I understand if your credit union has custom software running on old platforms. It’s expensive to change, and if it still serves your staff and members, why upgrade? That’s fine. But these systems cannot be connected to the public internet. Especially at a financial institution, this is asking for security breaches. Even with good procedures, it happens, all, the, time.

For the safety of your credit union, members, and staff, please update your public-facing systems.

© 2020 Credit Union Geek

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑