Socially-Distanced Marketing, Strategy, and The Force

Tag: tweets

Insights In 160 Characters…Or Less

Full posts are overrated. Ok, that’s not true. They are essential to delve into an issue beyond surface discussions. However, there’s also a time for brevity. Short and sweet, as you could say. I’ve found that much of my best wisdom has originated, spur of the moment, in a Twitter post or reply. If only I were as witty and intelligent in the rest of my life!

There has been a trend lately in terms of topics discussed, both for myself and the industry as a whole. Social Media and Big Data. I’ve written a lot of articles about both, but, let’s be honest. You wouldn’t read them even if they were linked here. However, I might get you to read a series of tweets which spur some new ways of thinking. Ready? Too bad…we’re off!

Social Media

On replying to online criticism/comments:

On producing content your members want to see:

On the difference between good and unique:

On catching attention, in almost any way you can:

On what (actually) makes credit unions different:

On reminding us all that failing is ok, too:

Finally, on being *that guy* in the conversation:

Big Data

On using for “any and all purposes”:

On understanding what you’re looking at:

On realizing nothing really has changed:

On having my A/C replaced:

Did any of those short statements/replies educate, inspire, or convince you of their importance? There’s always more where they came from. Simply follow me on Twitter @JoeCUGeek or comment on the post to start a new conversation!  I tried to share tweets which did not link to long reads, but some do slip through (most of mine go to something to dive deeper).  Also, I realized that searching through 4,000+ tweets is a pain for me, but a victory for you!

Bonus for reading to the end (or just scrolling to the bottom):

If Not Here, Then Where?

Every week, a new post appears like magic (I might have a fundamental misunderstanding of how this site works). It probably won’t surprise you to hear that each article is written to meet a specific length criteria. How do I come to this magic number?

Average reading speed for comprehension is between 200-400 words per minute. Posts are typically between 400-600 words in length. It is scientifically fair to say I ask for no more than 3 minutes a week of your attention. You’re busy, and a long essay is not on your radar. My goal is for the average post to be “just right” for your reading enjoyment. If not, please let me know!

What about in-between posts? Am I just holed up in some basement, tooling around on the latest technology? No, that’s ridiculous. I live in Florida and we don’t have basements. So are you saying there is something even shorter than posts? There’s actually two things! One is my newest category, CUbit, where I present topics that just must be discussed in the moment.  But the other? If it’s not on the site, then where? Never fear, Twitter is here! (Lost In Space reference, anyone?)

Twitter is where I reside. Which is great for your length challenges. Nothing written will be more than 140 characters, and if that’s too long, then here’s a clip you may enjoy.

An article is one-way; I say something, you read it, and maybe someone makes a comment. However, on Twitter, a post can directly mention a credit union or other user, or be a part of a larger saved search with various hashtags. It’s a participatory experience by nature. And the topics vary widely, from IT to space to credit union stories. The best way to understand is to join. By following @JoeCUGeek, you see my own tweets, as well as those I retweet from others. Some of my best work comes in 140 characters or less, if I do say so myself. Then be sure to follow other influencers within the industry and even branch out to your own interests. Keep in mind, the more you follow, the less you’ll see from each (it’s a single timeline, so the more users, the more posts).

While I share content on this site about once a week, my Twitter account remains active each day. So, if the biggest problem in your life was too little CU Geek, here’s your solution!

Image credit: http://www.politicspa.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/STREET_SIGNS.jpg

© 2020 Credit Union Geek

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑